Computer Science Department Student Handbook, 2013-14

Updated 2013.08.23

Departmental Goals

Advising Procedures

Course Sequence for a Computer Science Major

Internships

Requirements for a Computer Science Major

BCU's Academic Integrity Statement

Requirements for a Computer Science Minor

Computer Science Academic Integrity

Admission to the Department

Copyright Information

 

Department Faculty


Departmental Goals

The Computer Science program provides students with the opportunity to develop programming and problem solving skills, deal with abstract concepts, investigate applications of computers to other disciplines, and generally appreciate the nature and value of logical thought. Students learn to take a logical approach to a problem, research and assemble pertinent information, formulate hypotheses, carry out a plan, draw relevant conclusions, and communicate the results effectively to others.

Students majoring in Computer Science are prepared to enter careers in the fields of business and computing in the areas of computer programming and systems analysis and design. The Computer Science program provides a firm foundation of concepts and skills for graduate study.

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Requirements for a Computer Science Major

The following are the requirements for a major in Computer Science (in addition to the college's general requirements). Students may choose whether to get a B.A. or a B.S. degree. Differences in the two degrees are noted below.

1) At least 10 Computer Science courses which must include:

Both B.A. and B.S.:
10 CSCI courses numbered above 200.

2) 4 Computer Science IR courses (both B.A. and B.S.)

3) Support courses:
Both B.A. and B.S.:
MATH 200 Elementary Statistics or Math 360 Statistics
PHIL 212 Ethics of Business, Society, and the Environment
SPEC 111 Public Speaking

B.A. Option:
ACCT 203 Principles of Accounting I
ACCT 204 Principles of Accounting II
BUAD 225 Principles of Management
ECON 200 Survey of Economics
                 or
    ECON 201 & ECON 202

B.S. Option:


MATH 225
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4) Satisfactory demonstration of competencies in:

Mathematics (MATH 200 or MATH 360)
Foreign Language (either 2 years in high school or 2 semesters at BCU)
Writing (WRTG 109)
Oral Communication (SPEC 111)
Research (met through an IR)
Computer Usage (met through an IR)
Moral/Ethical Reasoning (PHIL 212)

5) Completion of a service component.

6) If you transfer CSCI classes to Briar Cliff from another college, you must take at least five CSCI 3-hour courses at Briar Cliff.

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Course Sequence for a Computer Science Major

The following is the suggested course sequence for completing a major in Computer Science (for students entering college in an even-numbered year):

 

Fall

Spring

Freshman

CSCI 201

CSCI 202

Sophomore

CSCI 325*

CSCI 321

CSCI 345*

CSCI 322*

Junior

CSCI 280* 

CSCI 380*

CSCI IR

CSCI 425*

CSCI IR

Senior

CSCI 360*

CSCI IR

CSCI IR

* = offered in alternate years.

The following is the suggested course sequence for completing a major in Computer Science (for students entering college in an even-numbered year):

 

Fall

Spring

Freshman

CSCI 201

CSCI 202

Sophomore

CSCI 280* 

CSCI 321

CSCI 425

Junior

CSCI 325*

CSCI 360*

CSCI IR

CSCI 322*

CSCI IR

Senior

CSCI 380*

 

CSCI 345*

 

* = offered in alternate years

NOTE: Internships are also available (and recommended) to qualified students.

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Requirements for a Computer Science Minor

The requirements for a minor in Computer Science are: any six CSCI 3-hour courses numbered above 200. At least three of the courses must be taken at Briar Cliff.

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Admission to the Department

Before applying for acceptance (declaring a major) in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, you must successfully complete a sequence of two basic courses. In Computer Science, they are CSCI 201 and CSCI 202. It is recommended that you have a minimum GPA of 3.00 in the basic courses and a minimum GPA of 2.00 overall. You should try to achieve grades of "B" or better in the basic courses; otherwise, your chances of doing well in the upper-level courses are not good.

After successfully completing the sequence of basic courses, obtain a Major Declaration Form from the Registrar's office and file it with the Chairperson. This constitutes notification of your intention to declare a major in the Department. Your application will be reviewed by the faculty of the Department, and, if approved, the signed form will be returned to you.

No student will be allowed to register for IR courses in mathematics or Computer Science without having been accepted in the Department.

To remain in the Department, you must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.00, and you may not receive more than one grade of C- or lower in a course in the major sequence (a course with a "CSCI" prefix). If your cumulative GPA falls below 2.00, or you receive a second grade of C- or lower in a major course (a course with a "CSCI" prefix), you will be placed on probationary status within the Department. You must then reapply for admission after having either brought up your cumulative GPA to 2.00 or repeating a course in which you received an unsatisfactory grade with a grade of "C" or better. No course may be repeated more than once to count for the major.

Students minoring in the Department may carry no more than one "C-" or lower in the minor and must have a minimum GPA of 2.00 in the courses required for the minor.

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Advising Procedures

Anyone having declared a major in mathematics or Computer Science will be assigned an advisor in the department. Although you are assigned a faculty advisor, you are still ultimately responsible for seeing that you meet the college's as well as the department's requirements for graduation. Your advisor's function is to help you plan your schedule and chart your progress.

Approximately one week before registration begins, an advising sign-up sheet will be posted on or outside your advisor's door. Some classes tend to close early and places will not be reserved for you. Before meeting with your advisor you should:

1) Have read the college catalog and this handbook
2) Know your remaining requirements
3) Have thoroughly reviewed the course offerings and have prepared a tentative class schedule and some possible alternative courses

If you find that you cannot make your advising appointment, please call or email to cancel.

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Internships

Internships in Computer Science are available to eligible students. A student may also develop his or her own internship if an opportunity presents itself. All internships must be approved by registration time, but students desiring an internship should begin looking into it at least a term in advance. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 as well as the approval of the department are required for eligibility.

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Academic Integrity Statement

The following is a copy of the Academic Integrity Statement taken from the Briar Cliff University catalog:

Briar Cliff University, as "a community within the Catholic and Franciscan tradition" strives to create an environment where the dignity of each person is recognized. Accordingly, integrity in relationships and work is supported and rewarded. Actions which are contrary to this spirit must be dealt with. Lack of integrity in academic work may appear in various forms, among which are cheating and plagiarism.

Cheating refers to the dissemination or use of unauthorized materials or information in completing an examination, paper, or other assignment. This includes collusion in completing assignments and copying from others.

Plagiarism is the submission, as a part of a course, work or papers (including oral presentations, projects, lab reports, experiments, etc.) in which a student represents the ideas, statements, or data of others as his/her own work. Another's work is represented as his/her own when it is copied or paraphrased without proper acknowledgment, such as footnotes, quotation marks, or direct statement.

The general policy of Briar Cliff University is that for a student's first offense, the instructor of the course will determine an appropriate penalty, with a maximum penalty of an "F" for the entire course. For a second offense, the course instructor and the Academic Dean will determine an appropriate penalty, up to and including immediate and permanent dismissal. For any offense after the second, the Academic Dean will determine an appropriate penalty, up to and including immediate and permanent dismissal from the college.

In all the alleged cases of cheating and plagiarism, the student shall be notified by the faculty member of the specific charges and circumstances in writing. A copy shall be sent to the Academic Dean. If the student wishes to deny the allegations, he/she must notify the department chairperson of the denial within ten days of notification. The chairperson will weigh the evidence presented by the student (in writing or at an oral hearing) and by the student's instructor, and make the final decision. (If the instructor is the chairperson of the department, the appeal shall be directed to the Academic Dean.) In the case of the third offense where the penalty is imposed by the Academic Dean, the appeal is to the President.

All material and information relative to any charge of cheating or plagiarism shall be kept by the Academic Dean in a special file during the period in which the student is enrolled at Briar Cliff University, serving only as a statement of record if the student is charged with a subsequent act of plagiarism or cheating. In case of an appeal after the first offense, the file shall be destroyed if the student is found not guilty of the offense. If there are no further charges, the file will be destroyed at the time of the student's graduation from Briar Cliff.

In order to support the Academic Integrity Statement, faculty members are expected to administer and monitor tests in a fair and consistent manner.

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Academic Integrity in Computer Science

Students are expected to use the computer in a responsible and ethical way. This includes

1)    Writing your own programs.

a.    You cannot give your program to another student or receive a program from another student.

b.    You cannot "work together" unless specifically told to do so on a given assignment. If you and another student each write your program, but you are both collaborating on the bulk of the program code, then you are not writing your own program, and are violating the academic integrity rules.

c.    You can ask another student for help on a specific part of the program.

d.    You can discuss the general algorithm with another student. But you must write your own implementation of the algorithm

2)    Using the academic computing facilities at Briar Cliff for academic purposes only. The computers should not be used for game playing, your own personal programming business, etc.

3)    Making no attempt to break into the system or into the accounts of other members of the community.

Students who use the computers on campus in an unethical way are subject to discipline by the Department and/or the College. In the event that an instructor suspects academic wrongdoing by a student using the college computing facilities, the instructor reserves the right, in cooperation with the computer center staff, to investigate the student's account(s).

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Copyright Information

Unless otherwise noted, Briar Cliff University has legal co-ownership of all software authored by a student when said software has been developed as part of required course work or when the development made use of the University's computing facilities.

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